Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs, Native, Carving, Totem Pole 6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit
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Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs, Native, Carving, Totem Pole  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit Monumental Totem by Master Carver Leo Jacobs  6' +, Leo Jacobs, native, Native American, native: carving, native: carving: totem pole, Northwest - Tlingit

Monumental totem by master carver leo jacobs

Item Number: AE0336


Totem by master carver Leo Jacobs (1923 - 1975). 12'5" totem with 9'5" carved section with three figures each approximately 3' tall plus a 3' tall base at bottom not carved. 1' width, 1' depth with attached wings 5' wide x 9" high. Center pencil line drawn on back from top to bottom and a small hole drilled for mounting. The wings are signed on back in pencil by "Leo Jacobs."Leo Jacobs Sr. was a Tlingit master carver and one of the founding members of Alaska Indian Arts (AIA) in Haines, Alaska. Leo Jacobs Sr. was among those emerging masters and was a respected and influential multi-disciplinary artist. In 1962, Jacobs and the other AIA carvers were invited to demonstrate their skills at the Alaska Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Seattle, a major platform for the artists and for Tlingit art. The exposure from the World’s Fair elevated the public profile of AIA and created a huge demand for their authentic, traditional carvings. Jacobs’ work can be found in public and private collections throughout Alaska and the world. Prominent pieces in Alaska include full-sized poles in the Federal Courthouses in Anchorage and Juneau, a pair of large house post style poles at the Alaska Railroad depot in Anchorage, the Raven Pole at the University of Alaska Southeast campus, multiple objects at the Haines Sheldon Museum and Alaska Indian Arts, and several poles in and around Haines (including one of welcome poles at Mile 1 of the Haines Highway and the pole at the Port Chilkoot tribal house). Sealaska Heritage Institute houses what is perhaps the most unique object associated with Jacobs – a bear mask that was taken onto the International Space Station by Chickasaw astronaut John Herrington in 2002, dubbed the “Space Bear” mask. This full-sized totem pole was carved by Tlingit master carver, Leo Jacobs Sr., and features crest animals from the Eagle moiety – Eagle, Wolf, and Bear. Tlingit culture has a moiety system – which means that Tlingit people are divided into two groups – Eagles and Ravens. The two moieties are exogamous, which means they marry outside their own group (Eagles marry Ravens and vice versa – colloquially called “opposites”). Additionally, Tlingit culture is matrilineal, which means they follow the lineage of their mothers. Under the moieties are clans and houses with crests that are owned by that group – in this case, Eagle, Wolf, and Bear fall under the Eagle side. Clans own all aspects of their crests – called at.óow – from the story of how the clan came to own the crest, to the imagery, songs, and names associated with it.This pole is finely sculpted in tight-grained, old growth red cedar and features Jacobs’ signature feathered knifework. This pole was carved in the early-to-mid 1960s and exemplifies mid-20th century Tlingit carving. It is painted in the traditional colours of red, green/blue, and black and incorporates expertly executed formline designs in the wings of the Eagle, as well as in the ears, paws, and faces of the other figures. The emphasis on formline in the design reflects the period that this pole was made – what art historians have referred to as the “Renaissance” of Northwest Coast art. The condition of this pole is phenomenal due to it being stored by the original owner and unlike most full-sized poles, has not been weathered through exposure to the elements. The pole is also clearly signed in pencil by Jacobs on the rear side. The three-foot blank shaft at the bottom of this pole was designed to support it in the ground after installation and could be used for that purpose or trimmed to accommodate the buyer’s height requirements. Due to his relatively short life, Jacobs’ original work is rarely available on the market. Virtually all of his full-sized totem poles have either long since settled into permanent collections or stood in the elements for the last several decades and are in an advanced stage of deterioration. This pole is an immaculate example of Jacobs’ work and is an important physical document of an exciting and innovative time in Alaska Native art. Additional documentation available.

PERIOD: Mid 20th Century

ORIGIN: Northwest - Tlingit, Native American

SIZE: 12'5"


PRICE $ 55,000

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